Copywriting

The Easiest Blog Post You Will Ever Write

The Easiest Blog Post You Will Ever Write

The Easiest Blog Post You Will Ever Write

Writing your own original articles and blog posts is mandatory if you own a list or run an internet business. Blogging is risk free and should be part of any online business.

Mandatory. Part of your standard operating procedures. A basic staple. Something you can’t do without. You get the picture.

Blog articles can be used in so many ways that I’d need to write an article just to explain all the ways you can profit from articles. 🙂

More on that another day.


By the way, if you are serious and want to take your blogging to the next level, check out the Rapid Blogging Blueprint. This is a premium level training that takes you through each and every step of setting up your own highly profitable blog and profiting from it. You can check it out here.


In today’s post I’m going to show you how to write an incredibly easy blog article that is specifically for beginners within your market.

The idea in a nutshell is this –

Answer a set of three basic questions related to a topic relevant to your target audience.

If you can answer just three simple questions, you can crank out article after article for newbies in your particular field of interest or expertise.

These three questions are –

  1. What is _________?
  2. Can you show me an example of _________?
  3. How can I get started with _________?

Let me walk you through writing an article with these questions as the backbone of your content.

Before we get into the 7 very easy steps, let’s take just a quick look at the schematics of your article. In order to write an 800-1000 word article, your basic needs for the various parts of the article would look something like this…

Opening (125 Words)
Question #1 (250 Words)
Question #2 (250 Words)
Question #3 (250 Words)
Closing (125 Words)
_______________________

Total = 1000 Words

Now, on with the show…

1. Determine Your Title

Most people don’t spend much time on their title and that’s a no-no. It’s a flagrant foul in basketball. A bounced check. A driver cutting you off in traffic. Things that are mindless.

As with everything I ever say about writing articles, your title is important. Very important. Imagine this scenario…

You’re searching the internet for blogs or sifting through articles at your favorite directory in hopes of finding some useful tips for selecting curriculum for your upcoming homeschooling year.

Which of these would you take a closer look at…

  • The Easiest Way To Choose Your Curriculum
  • Making Your Curriculum Choice
  • 5 Questions To Ask When Choosing Curriculum
  • Homeschool Book Decisions
  • Choosing Your Homeschool Resources

While all of these are related to choosing your homeschool curriculum, “The Easiest Way…” and “5 Questions To Ask…” probably have more appeal. If you’re pressed for time, you probably aren’t going to read all five … you might read two.

And the title is going to determine which two gets your attention.

So, first things first, it’s important that you create an appealing title. We’ll talk more about this in another lesson, but three simple “rules” that I go by in crafting titles that I’d like to pass on to you are…

  • Be specific. It’s not “Questions To Ask”, it’s “5 Questions To Ask”. It’s not, “Lose Pounds”, it’s “Lose 3 Pounds in 7 Days”.
  • Make It Simple. Who would ever read an article, “7 Extremely Hard Ways To Lose Weight”? Or, “Top 10 Most Difficult Ways To Find A Date For Valentine’s Day”? Offer SIMPLE solutions. EASY ways to accomplish a desired result.
  • Speak To A Group. If your article is intended for a specific group (I.E. Beginners, WAHMs, Christians, Senior Citizens, College Students, etc.) then say so in your title. Rather than “How To Write An Ebook”, go with “The Beginners’ Guide to Writing An eBook” or “How To Write a Christian eBook”.

So, determine your title and then begin the writing process.

Hint: Go to good old EzineArticles.com and review the titles of other articles (paying particular attention to which articles are viewed the most – indicating their popularity) and then use those titles to model your own after. I.E. If you see the popular title, “The Easiest Way To Lose 10 Pounds And Get In Shape Fast!” you could easily entitle your own article, “The Easiest Way To Learn Guitar And Play Songs Fast!”

And don’t forget Amazon.com. Go and find the bestselling books in your niche and take a look at the Table Of Contents for more inspiration for articles.

2. Write Your Opening

You’ve got about 30 seconds to get your reader’s attention if you’re going to get them to consume your entire article. That’s not much. It’s important that you get them interested quickly. I’m going to share three to get you started…

  • “There must be some reason why some _________ outperform others.” . This opening is all about informing the reader that some people have an advantage over others. And, in order to level the playing field, they need to follow the advice in your article. Example: “There must be some reason why certain tennis players win more matches than others. Said another way, if two equally skilled tennis player compete … why does one get to go home a winner and the other a loser?”
  • “I’ve always been impressed with those who could __________.” . This opening allows you to mention a specific result that is desired to, not only you, but the reader as well. Your article teaches the person how they too can experience the desired result. Example: “I’ve always been impressed with those who could hit a backhand winner on the run. It never came easy to me and I have marveled many times when others seem to hit that shot so effortlessly. Then, I figured out their secret…”
  • “Do you find yourself _________?” This opening is a good one because it allows the reader to identify with what you’re writing about. When they say “yes” to your question, then they know the article is for them … and they’ll read on to discover what they can do about the problem they face. Example: “Do you find yourself double-faulting a lot? For years I gave away point after point – usually in critical times during my matches – by hitting into the net or just beyond the service box. Finally, I paid for a lesson from the local pro and this is what he taught me…”

Choose one of these openings (or one from the related article coming tomorrow) and write approximately 125 words as your introduction to the article. Be sure to transition from your opening into your first question.

You can do this in one of two ways: (a) Specifically mention that you’ll be answering the three most asked questions from beginners, or (b) Simply answer the questions without ever actually posing the questions in the text of your article.

3. Answer Question #1

If you’ll recall from earlier, question number one is…

“What is _________ ?”

Simply plug in the topic of your article into that question … and then answer it in approximately 250 words.

  • What is tennis strategy?
  • What is podcasting?
  • What is virtual real estate?
  • What is forex trading?
  • What is retinopathy?
  • What is a VoIP phone?
  • What is Tai Chi?

Give a brief explanation of the topic in your own words and then move on to the next question which builds upon the first question.

4. Answer Question #2

 

That question again is…

“Can you show me an example of ________?”

Now the article is taking shape. We go from an introduction to an explanation and now we have an illustration. You’ve explained what it is and now you’ll explain what it looks like. Provide an example. A case study. An illustration. A method. Something the reader can identify with to better understand what you’re saying.

  • You’ve explained what tennis strategy is … now give a scenario in which tennis strategy is at work.
  • You’ve explained what virtual real estate is … now give an example piece of VRE property.
  • You’ve explained what Tai Chi is … now share one of the key moves of the discipline.

After providing some sort of example, move on to question number three…

5. Answer Question #3

From earlier in our lesson, the final question is…

“How can I get started with __________? “

It all climaxes with 1-3 simple steps the reader can follow in order to begin practicing your teaching.

By this point the reader knows WHAT the topic is about, and they know a basic use or function of the topic. Now, they need a simple explanation of how they can get started with application. How can they use the information?

You can either give the reader ONE action step to take in order to get started (I.E. The first thing you’ll want to do is enroll in a class.) or you can provide them with a simple set of THREE steps to put into practice as a sort of mini-system (I.E. Step

One is… Step Two is… Step Three is…).

6. Decide Upon A Close

To complete your article, you’ll want to use your final 125 words (approximately) to close out your content. There are two components of the article close that I think are necessities if you want to see any results from your efforts.

  • The Spark. You want to leave the reader with a desire to get started. You want them excited. You want them motivated. You want them to take action. I’m not necessarily talking about giving them a rah-rah pep talk (although that might not hurt either!). I’m speaking of getting them to realize that they can get the desired results they want if they’ll get busy doing something. Your job at the close of the article is to encourage them (gently or blatantly) and challenge them to achieve.
  • The Segway. The other thing you must do during your close is to lead into your resource box. Your article is for the reader. Your resource box is for you. Your content is to provide useful information for the reader. Your resource box is to get the reader to a point where you present an offer. And the closing of your article is the place where the two roads meet. Lead the reader to a decision to make a positive change in their life – to take action. And then use your resource box to provide a means to do just that.

7. Create A Featured Resource Box

Most people use the same generic resource box with each of their articles. In other words, it’s the same resource box regardless of what the article is about.

That’s a big mistake in my opinion.

With an ever-changing audience reading articles about ever-changing topics why would you want to use a never-changing resource box?

Your resource box – in order to be truly effective – must be a continuation of the article itself. It must offer something more that is directly related to the content of the article.

I mean, think about it: the reader has warmed up to you at this point. You’ve shared something useful. They like your style. They are pumped up and ready to take action. Why blow that moment with a resource box that does nothing to really enhance or continue or build upon where they are at this moment in time?

Let me give you an example:

If I’ve just explained what tennis strategy is about, pointed them to an example of tennis strategy and briefly outlined how they can create their own tennis strategy – which is more effective at this point…

  • Jason Daly is the publisher of Tennis Tips, a free weekly newsletter full of informative helps for tennis players of all skill levels. For your free subscription, drop by http://www.JasonsTennisTips.com today.
  • Jason Daly is the author of How To Outplay Your Opponents By Outsmarting Them, a free strategy report for tennis players of all skill levels. Grab your complimentary copy at http://www.JasonsStrategyReport.com today.

Obviously, having just read the article on tennis strategy, you’d be more likely to take action if resource box #2 was in place … because it’s a continuation of the article. It’s part 2. The sequel. The rest of the story.

Note: And, upon visiting my site and registering for the free report, you’re automatically going to receive my free newsletter as well anyway.

The point is this: a carefully crafted resource box — one that is specifically relevant to the article itself — will outperform a generic resource box. You’ll get more results by using a resource box that builds upon what’s been shared in the article it is attached to.

So, that’s an incredibly easy way to write a good blog article.

You can crank out an entire series of these articles for beginners. All you need to do is answer three simple questions.

  1. What is _________?
  2. Can you show me an example of _________?
  3. How can I get started with _________?

It works for any niche. Any topic. Any person. So what are you waiting for?

If you really want to know more about the power of blogging, you can take a look at the Rapid Blogging Blueprint training course or if you just want a few pointers for now you can grab the featured resource below for a  free blogging report; download, read it and take action 🙂

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Discover How Using Honesty Will Boost Your Email Open Rates

Discover How Using Honesty Will Boost Your Email Open Rates

Discover How Using Honesty Will Boost Your Email Open Rates

You may have heard marketers say, “Email marketing is dead” … or email deliverability rates are low these days. The list of complaints is many and by all appearances, it seems like email marketing is getting tougher now because more and more subscribers are wary and jaded.

Marketing emails are viewed skeptically, and subscribers are much more discerning now. This is why some marketers have started using platforms like Facebook Messenger or bot services such as ManyChat or MobileMonkey because engagement is generally higher, but that doesn’t always convert into leads or sales.

Yet, there are a handful of marketers who excel at email marketing. They have high open rates, high click through rates and their emails get them a ton of sales and commissions.

So, how do they do it?

The answer is simple. They have a good relationship with their list, and they have a good sized list. The best way to build your list fast will be to retain your current subscribers as you add more to the list. If each email you send gets many unsubscribes, it will be an uphill task.

Ultimately, you need to be an honest and transparent marketer who is unique enough to stand above the noise. This is crucial to building trust and getting you noticed by your subscriber.

Don’t think of your email list as simply a cash cow to promote your (or affiliate) products or services, but rather think of them as your tribe.

Once you can achieve these 2 goals, getting people to open your emails and buy your products or the products you recommend will be a breeze.

You must treat them well and make them realise that you are simply trying to help them. The fact that you may make money by them buying your products or services is simply a byproduct of your helping them to succeed. Of course, this need to be a genuine desire to help them; you will NOT be able to fake this, so don’t even try!

Use the 5 pointers below to boost your open rates by winning your list over with your personality

Promote Only What You Believe In

This is a HUGE factor when it comes to building trust with your list. You should always promote or sell products that are of high-quality and will get the buyer their money’s worth.

Too many marketers these days tend to promote every product under the sun just so that they can get commissions.

In the short run, this may work… but over time, their list will stop trusting them and the sales will dry up faster than a wet towel in the Sahara desert.

Do your research on the product, the product creator, the price, the pros and cons, etc. This will allow you to give an honest review of the product and if it’s something that you wouldn’t buy… do NOT recommend it.

Show Them You’ve Purchased The Product

One of the best ways to inspire your list to buy the product you’re recommending. Even if you received a review copy or a complimentary gift in return for a promotion, go ahead and buy the product if you like it.

Take a screenshot of your purchase and display it in your email to show that you actually forked out money for it.

This will show that you too have skin in the game and you’re truly recommending something that you believe in.

Test Out The Product If You Can

Test the product out and see if it works. It doesn’t matter if it’s perfume or some ‘make money online’ (MMO) eBook that promises profits.

Make sure that you test the product out and see the results for yourself. Do you like it? Does it deliver on its promises? Is it worth the money?

If the answer is yes to all of the above questions, then you can promote it knowing full well that it’s good. Do not blindly pass off the claims on the sales copy as gospel when doing a review.

Don’t Contradict Yourself

This is very common among online marketers who promote products in the MMO niche. On one day they may be praising a particular YouTube video ranking software and saying that it’s the ‘last one you’ll ever need.’

A week later, when a new but similar video ranking software is released, they’ll promote this like it’s the best thing you’ll ever need.

Your subscribers can see through these shenanigans. Do not contradict yourself in your emails. If you’re promoting a software that is really good, then you should get a copy of it yourself and try it out.

You can then share your knowledge and tips with the list and show them the results you got from using the software.

You’re supposed to promote and also help your subscribers learn to use what they buy. You can create tutorial videos, blog posts. etc. to guide them. You are limited by your own imagination as far as delivering value goes. That’s what a wise marketer would do instead of pushing every piece of junk that hits the market.

Finding Your Voice

As a marketer, you’ll need to stand out from the rest. There are many ways to do this. You could use photos of yourself in your emails or have an attractive personality that comes across in your emails.

A sense of humor or brutal honesty or links to videos that you’ve made will help your readers get to know you better.

The key to being unique is to let your personality shine. Do not try to fake it till you make it or act like an authority who is pulling in six figures a month, if you’re not even close. The age old dating advice of just being yourself applies here too.

If you can practice these 5 tips and make them second nature to your email marketing, your open rates will skyrocket, and your subscribers will look forward to your emails.

If you want to know more about nurturing you list, check out the featured resource below for a free Simple List Building report; download, read it and take action 😊

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How To Write And Design A Compelling Landing Page

How To Write And Design A Compelling Landing Page

How To Write And Design A Compelling Landing Page

Whether you’re writing lead nurturing emails, drafting blog posts or shooting an ad for your YouTube channel, in order to be a successful inbound marketer, you have to be a master content creator.

Generally, when people think about landing pages they automatically jump to conversions: but there’s more to it.

Factors such as how often visitors abandon your form, which particular treatment performs better or what the bounce rate is: all these metrics boil down to how well you craft your content.

But writing a good website landing page is somewhat different from say, a blog post.

Several nuances necessitate a different approach when handling landing page copywriting and while these nuances might seem minor, they have significant impact on conversions.

And while the main point is to get the lead, you also want to redirect them immediately to a sales page with a relevant offer after signing up to try to monetise the lead as soon as possible.

So if you’re trying to find a way to create effective copy that leads to a successful “squeeze page”, consider these practices.

Work On The Headline

Your target here is to make sure the landing page refers to the place from which every visitor came.

Likewise if an ad copy drove them there, ensure the headline refers to where they came from.

Your language should match exactly, so that your visitors stay oriented and engaged. This is a crucial part of your landing page.

Clear Call To Action

Some of your options here include using hot-linked text or graphic buttons but whatever you use, make sure your visitor knows what they need to do.

A short landing page should do well with at least 2 calls to action; and 3-5 in a longer landing page. Testing headlines and copy texts will give you the best results: but you may choose to spice it up a bit.

Always write in the second person

Your visitors don’t care much about you, your company or even services and products, except as to how they benefit them. Forge a stronger connection between the reader and whatever you have to offer by speaking to them directly, and that way you’ll have successfully demonstrated the value of your offer- by showing the reader how they can benefit from it.

Write A Clear, Persuasive Message

You might be temped to showcase your creativity here, or how good you are at turning a clever phase. Keep in mind this is business, and not an art class, so you have little room to express your creative genius.

Try to think of the most direct way to say what you want, and avoid jargon or literary flair if it detracts from the essence of your message.

It’s OK To Write Long Copy But…

Your readers can and will follow long copy provided you keep presenting a solid case. But not every service or product will require the same amount of copy so adjust accordingly.

Short copy is perfect for subscription or something that doesn’t include cash commitment. Long copy is best used when closing a sale.

Get To The Point Fast

Most of your visitors are gleaning and skipping through content and you only have three seconds to get their attention before they hit the back button.

People tend to read beginnings and ends before they focus on middles so you need to find a way to position your most critical arguments in these positions.

Make it easy for them to get the message so you don’t lose leads or new reconverts.

Learn To Use Reader Keywords

What on earth is a reader keyword? Think of the words your visitor will look for- not the search engine- when they scan your page.

Readers will assume the page they landed on is related to the CTA or page they came from so you need to confirm this for them.

You may use the same phrases -or close variations- to let the reader know they’re on track.

Draft Value-Oriented Language

This is the “so what?” of your page copy. This is where you spend time convincing your visitor that the time he or she will spend filling out the form is worth it because of the offer they’ll receive.

Make it a rule to include a header on every landing page that explains a specific benefit– “If you purchase this, you will get.”– or something similar.

This way you will pinpoint the value of your offer.

Work On The Format

Good landing page has much to do with sentence structure and word choice as it does presentation.

Your copy might be decent enough but if its not visually appealing, they might lose interest with the information.

You can get over this hurdle by breaking up your copy and using headers of varying sizes, and make use of bold text, italics, checkmarks, parentheticals, etc.

Consistency

Finally, after writing and formatting your copy, go back one last time and proofread the copy.

Remember you’re trying to convince people to give you their personal information and they are not likely to do so if they find your copy riddled with errors.

Go over the grammar, spelling, accuracy, consistency and facts.

Here’s where people go wrong:

  • Using different spellings for the same words and terms
  • Losing track of uppercase and lowercase letters when writing terms such as “eBook”.
  • Messing up dates
  • Giving inaccurate data
  • Quoting the wrong sources

Test Everything

As with any aspect of landing page optimization, you need to keep testing. These tricks and tips will get you started but your work doesn’t end there: design plays a huge role in this.

Elements such as color, layout, images- these are crucial interactivity elements whose single purpose is to engage the reader at a deeper level and cause a response.

Likewise your audio and video play a major role and they all need regular testing in order to effectively merit a deeper look.

Finally, you may need to minimize the amount of clutter on your page. This means removing visual clutter, navigation bars and certain links. If you want the reader to focus on your copy, don’t give them any distractions.

Make sure your supportive visual keeps them engaged but not side-tracked. This should be enough to get you positive results consistently.

Any type of marketing funnel relies on good sales copy and there are many pitfalls and mistakes that inexperienced copywriters can make. If you want to know more about avoiding these and other copywriting mistakes, take a look at the featured resource below where you can download a copy of a free report, Copywriting Blunders, so you will be forewarned and can make your copy more effective. Download, read it and take action 😊

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17 Ways To Create Blog Posts That Get Attention

17 Ways To Create Blog Posts That Get Attention

17 Ways To Create Blog Posts That Get Attention

You can put a lot of content up on your blog, but your blog isn’t going to be successful if no one is reading the content.

That’s why one of the biggest keys to your success is to create engaging content that attracts readers and keeps them coming back to your blog again and again.

Here’s how to do it…

1. Give Your Audience What They Want

The first thing you need to do is understand what your audience wants. In other words, what sort of content are they already consuming? Here’s how to figure this out:

  • Find out what sort of infoproducts they’re buying. Check bestsellers on marketplaces such as Amazon.com, Udemy.com. ClickBank.com and JVZoo.com.
  • See what topics get a lot of traction on social media.
  • Check question and answer sites to see what’s popular, including Quora.com, Yahoo! Answers, and JustAnswer.com.
  • Browse niche groups (on Facebook) and forums to see what topics keep popping up again and again.
  • Read your competitors’ blogs to see which topics get a lot of discussion and social media shares.
  • Ask your audience what they’d like to learn more about.Check your own blog to see what topics you’ve posted about in the past that have generated a lot of interest.

Next…

2. Write For Your Audience

In order to write for your audience, you need to understand exactly who they are. You’ll need to do some research to uncover their demographics, and then spend some time reading niche discussions and talking to your audience to learn more about them.

Here’s what you want to know:

  • Age
  • Gender
  • Where they live.
  • Marital status.
  • Kids or not.
  • Rent or own.
  • Income level.
  • Education level.
  • Biggest niche challenges/obstacles/pain points.
  • Solutions they’ve tried.
  • Why those solutions haven’t worked.
  • What they want.
  • What motivates them.
  • Where they get their niche information.
  • Their niche level (beginner, intermediate, expert).

Next…

3. Catch Attention With Titles

Engagement starts with your blog titles, which is why you need to invest time creating benefit-driven titles with a little razzle dazzle to catch attention.

For example, “How to Lose Weight” shares a benefit. It’s descriptive, but it’s also a little boring.

In order to catch attention, you need to add a little razzle dazzle. E.G., “The Weird Weight Loss Trick That Shook Hollywood (Psst, It Will Work for You Too!)”


By the way, if you are serious and want to take your blogging to the next level, check out the Rapid Blogging Blueprint. This is a premium level training that takes you through each and every step of setting up your own highly profitable blog and profiting from it. You can check it out here.


Next…

4. Open With A Bang

You need to capture attention right away, which is why your opener should work hard to get and keep your audience’s attention. You can do this by:

  • Building anticipation by adding a “key points” section in your opener.
  • Telling a story right away.
  • Providing a startling fact or statistic.
  • Busting a myth, or sharing other unexpected information.
  • Sharing a really good tip right away to build interest.
  • Posting an interesting quote (from a famous person).
  • Showing that you understand the reader and their problem, such as by empathizing with the reader.

Next…

5. Create “You”-Centered Content

Your content needs to be all about your readers, specifically with regards to their problems and how to solve them. Unfortunately, some bloggers tend to make their content more about themselves, such as how they discovered a particular tip or trick.

Yes, you do need to talk about yourself from time to time, such as when you share your credentials or you tell an engaging story. However, you want to be sure to pivot immediately back to your readers to keep the focus on them.

Here’s a quick way to check if you’re focused on your readers: see how many times you use words like “you” and “your,” versus words centered on yourself (such as I, me, and mine). Rewrite author-oriented content to make it more about the reader.

For example, “I’ll share my favorite weight-loss trick” is author-oriented. You can rewrite it to change the focus like this: “You’ll discover a proven weight-loss trick.”

6. Avoid Passive Language

Passive language is where you craft sentences so that the subject receives an action, rather than the subject performing an action. Readers tend to find it tedious and boring to read this sort of content.

Here’s an example of a passive sentence: The dog must be walked five times per day.

You’d rewrite it to make it active, like this: You must walk the dog five times per day.

7. Engage Readers With Stories

One really good way to engage readers on an emotional level is to draw them in with a story.

For example, you can write a story about how you or someone else in the niche overcame the same problem as your readers.

Another example: You might share a heartwarming story, or even a story about an embarrassing moment.  These stories build rapport.

Still one more example: if you’re trying to share a lesson, share it in the form of a story. It makes it both more engaging and memorable.

8. Ask Questions To Engage Readers

You can ask questions in the beginning, middle or end of your content to engage readers and encourage them to interact. For example:

  • Have you ever _______?
  • Do you ever feel ________?
  • How would you feel?
  • What is your favorite tip?
  • What is the hardest part of _______?
  • What do you think?
  • What would you do?

Next…

9. Build Anticipation And Curiosity

Starting in the beginning and sprinkled throughout your content, you’ll want to build anticipation and curiosity for what’s coming.

For example: “In just a moment, you’ll discover the #1 way to get 1000 visitors in the next 24 hours.  But first…”

Likewise, if you have a blog series, then be sure to build anticipation for the other articles in the series.

E.G., “Tomorrow you’ll find out which food you should NEVER eat if you want to lose weight – and chances are, you’ve already eaten it this week!”

10. Make Your Audience Smile

If you can make your audience feel something (especially a positive emotion), you’re going to have their full attention. One way to do this is to inject some humor (sparingly) into your content to make your audience smile and chuckle.

Before you start cracking jokes in your content, be sure that you’ve researched your audience, and you understand them.

What people find humorous is subjective, and it also differs across cultures. Indeed, what you find funny may be outright offensive to others, so keep your humor G-related and appropriate.

11. Serve Up Unique Content

One really good way to keep readers engaged is to give them content they’ve never seen before. Elsewhere in these guides, we’ve talked about how to create unique content, such as by sharing unique case studies, stories, and even creating formulas to teach step-by-step content.

Here’s another idea: use fresh comparisons to explain concepts and even step-by-step processes.

In some cases, the actual how-to information you’re sharing isn’t unique. However, the way you position and present the information can be unique – and that’s exactly what will keep readers engaged.

Let’s suppose you’re writing about customer retention. Most of your competitors are going to list and explain all the components of creating satisfied customers. You can make your content unique by comparing customer retention to the Hollywood red-carpet VIP treatment. It’s a simple thing, but it makes your content more interesting, and it stands out from other similar content.

12. Be Concise

If you want to keep readers engaged, then cut out all the fluff and filler. If a page, a paragraph, or even a sentence isn’t necessary to getting your point across, then delete it. You want to keep your content concise and “meaty,” which will keep readers engaged.

One good way to keep your content focused is to create an outline before you write. The key here is to make this outline as detailed as possible.

Not only should you list the major steps and points you want to cover, but you can also list substeps, tips, examples and so on. Then once you start writing, stick to your outline, and delete anything that veers from this outline.

13. Use A Friendly Tone

If you remember reading a few textbooks during your school days, you might also remember some pretty yawn-inducing passages. The problem? These textbook writers shared information, but they didn’t seem all that interested in connecting with readers. While their writing may be technically correct, it’s boring.

Naturally, you’ll want to avoid this sort of stilted, textbook-style writing.

One way to connect with your readers is to write with a friendly, conversational tone.

Think of how you’d write to a friend, and share your content in a similar manner. (This guide is an example of writing with a friendly tone – note how this content isn’t speaking above anyone, it’s not pretentious, and it doesn’t try to impress with big words and complex sentence structure.)

14. Offer Quick Wins

A quick win is a tip or other bit of information that someone can apply fairly quickly, and then get fairly quick results too. Your readers should be able to instantly recognize the value of the information and how quickly they’ll get good results if they apply it.

For example, if you’re sharing information to beginning marketers about how to find a niche, you might teach them to use a keyword tool to find niches they never knew existed (e.g., enter partial searches such as “how to ____” and “get rid of” and “secrets of”).

Your audience can literally apply that information instantly, and in minutes have a list of potential niches to explore.

Quick wins keep your readers engaged on the current blog post they’re reading, as they’ll be eagerly searching for other gold nuggets of information. However, making a habit of providing quick wins in your posts also keeps readers engaged with your blog as a whole and coming back for more.

15. Insert Awesome Visuals

Another way to engage readers is by inserting useful, polished graphics. This includes:

  • Infographics.
  • Tables.
  • Charts.
  • Illustrations.
  • Screenshots.
  • Photos.
  •  GIFs.

 And similar images.

For example, you might include an infographic to make data-heavy information easier to understand.

Another example: you might include a photo or illustration that shows someone how to do something (such as the proper way to stand when doing a weight-lifting exercise such as a squat).

Need a real-life example to view right now?  Take a look at the articles on BuzzFeed.com. You’ll see that many of them include memes and GIFs to keep readers interested and hooked until the end.

Point is, a good visual can attract the eye and draw the reader back into the text, and it can also add a lot of value to the content. Either way, good visuals engage readers!

16. Share Tips And Examples

Another way to add value while engaging readers is to generously provide plenty of tips and examples in your content.

As an example, take a look at #15 above. The instruction was to provide visuals in your blog posts.

You then got a list of seven examples of different types of visuals you can create, along with specific examples of some of those seven types.

17. Format For Easy Readability

If people come to your blog and see a wall of text, they’re going to hit the back button without even bothering to begin reading your content. That’s why you need to format your content for easy readability, which is a crucial key to engaging readers.

Check out these tips:

  • Break up long list paragraphs by using bulleted lists instead (like this one).
  • Use short sentences and short paragraphs.
  • Insert graphics to help break up long passages of text.
  • Utilize headings and subheadings to provide white space and highlight important information.

You should also ensure your blog uses a responsive theme with a column layout.  This ensures that when people read your articles on a mobile device, the article text takes up the entire screen (that’s desirable on small screens).

On the other hand, if someone is reading your article on a large desktop monitor, you do NOT want the article to take up the entire screen, as it’s difficult to read content across a large screen.

The content should cover part of the screen, and the sidebar should cover the remaining part. Again, use a responsive theme, which will resize your columns for easy readability, depending on the device.

Now a few parting thoughts…

Conclusion

The people with the biggest, most popular and most profitable blogs are also the folks who know how to craft engaging content.

If you’re looking to find that sort of success with your blog, then I highly recommend you putting these 17 keys for crafting engaging content to work for you.

If you really want to know more about the power of blogging, you can take a look at the Rapid Blogging Blueprint training course or if you just want a few pointers for now you can grab the featured resource below for a  free blogging report; download, read it and take action 🙂

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How To Make Your Audience Love Your Webinars And Live Events

How To Make Your Audience Love Your Webinars And Live Events

How To Make Your Audience Love Your Webinars And Live Events

There is more to hosting a webinar than simply having one. You need to ensure that it’s fun, informative and useful too. When people go to a webinar, they know that they’ll get a sales pitch eventually. But what makes them come back is the actual content outside of the sales pitch.

Plus, if they choose to purchase due to your sales pitch, the product must be fabulous. If you offer your audience amazing promises, you need to live up to them.

There are many types of webinar software that you can choose for your webinar marketing, and the one you choose will depend on personal preference mainly.

Webinar platforms vary greatly in price and features, and it pays to think ahead as to what your needs may be in the future if your business starts to grow; will your business include webinar training or are you simply using a webinar for marketing purposes? All these factors will help you to decide which platform is best for you.

Once you have your ideal platform, you need to focus on the content so let’s look at some ways to make your webinars shine and make people want to sign up for your products or services.

* Make It Educational – Every webinar should offer a message that educates the audience on something they need to know and can put into action right away. If the message is informative and gives them something they can do without even buying your offer, they’ll want to see more from you and may eventually buy your products or use your services.

* Keep the Message Clear – If your message isn’t crystal clear to your audience, they may leave your webinar confused. You don’t want that to happen. You want your audience to be able to digest the information in an understandable way.

* Be Entertaining – While you’re getting them the information, it’s important to also not make it boring. Be lively and entertaining. Share a story that they can relate to. Show your humanity to them and they’ll want to know more.

* Pick an Awesome Topic – This is really the most important part of the webinar. Your topic should be something that makes your audience excited to learn more. In order to choose the right topic, you need to match your expertise with what your audience needs.

* Give Attendees a Special Gift – Approximately 75 percent of the people who sign up for your webinar will not attend. But you can boost attendance if you give those who attend something no one else will get. Make it something people will talk about.

* Host It at the Right Day and Time – Knowing your audience will also help you know the perfect day and time to host your webinar. You may ultimately choose to host more than one in order to cover all the bases.

* Create an Awesome Information Page – This is not a sales page, but instead a page that lets those who have signed up for your event know what exactly will happen at the event. You can mention the freebies you’ll be giving away during the webinar and the information you’ll cover more in depth.

* Follow Up – When someone signs up for the webinar you should have an autoresponder set up to immediately thank them for signing up, sharing the information page and other information that will encourage them to attend the webinar live.

* Send Reminders – Sometimes people do not attend the webinar live simply due to forgetting. Some webinar systems have the ability to set up reminders, but even if it doesn’t you can set them up with the autoresponder system.

You can work diligently to make the webinar a success, but if you don’t include these factors you may not have that many attendees. Understanding who your audience is and what they need is your first step to ensuring that all your webinars resonate with your audience. The more your events solve problems for your audience, entertain them and wow them, the more likely they are to come back.

Of course, digital events aren’t the only way to reach your audience. You can also go in person to local events, and these can be used to network with potential business partners or to find new customers.

Here are a few pointers to keep in mind when attending a live event.

Do’s And Don’ts At Local Events

Building your business with networking is important, but you need to make sure you do it right.

To ensure that you do it correctly and don’t make common mistakes, here are the dos and don’ts of networking at local events.

This list is by no means exhaustive, but it gives you some idea of local event etiquette!

Networking Do’s

* Thoroughly practice your thirty-second elevator pitch. You need to get this down so you can get all of the points out that you need to express to people in just thirty seconds. It should be second nature, so when you meet people on the fly you can tell them what you’re all about.

* Social media is great, but so are face-to-face meetings. When your online contacts are in the area, plan time to meet face to face. Attend regular meetups in your area as well. Those face-to-face meetings are great for making connections.

* Have a good handshake. A handshake says a lot about a person. Make it a good, firm handshake.

* Always have your business cards at the ready. You really never know when you’re going to meet someone, so be sure you carry business cards with you at all times.

* If you make a promise, then be sure that you follow through on it. Follow up with the people that you meet. This is going to build those relationships you made nice and strong.

* Keep in touch. Have regular meetings with your network and be sure to offer them your assistance when asking for their help on something. If you’re having an event, then invite the people in your network too.

* Ask for help. If you’re looking to expand your business, then you need people to help you get the word out. Make sure you ask your network to help you out with spreading the word on whatever you’re working on or whatever you need help with.

* Set goals. Having measurable goals in your networking will help keep you on track and get your business where you want it to be on a specific timeline.

* Be grateful. Saying thank you to your contacts will go a long way in showing your appreciation for what they have done for you.

* Find ways to give back to your network. This is a great way to show appreciation, but it also builds those relationships even stronger when you can help out those who have helped you. No one wants to feel used, so that’s why it’s so important to give back.

Networking Don’ts

* Hard sell. If it’s the first-time meeting someone, then you shouldn’t do a hard sell on your product. This should be a time of getting to know you and what you are all about, not about getting money out of someone for your product.

* Monopolize the time talking about yourself. You should be finding out about the person you’re meeting rather than telling them all about you. If you show interest in the other person, then they will be more interested in you as someone who listens.

* Drink too much. Give yourself a two-drink maximum when you’re networking. It will make sure that you are coherent when you talk, and that you don’t say anything you later wish you hadn’t.

What networking advice do you have for local events?

OK, there are some handy hints to maximise your efforts in both local in-person events and webinars and I hope they were useful to you.

Any type of webinar or sales presentation relies on good sales copy and there are many pitfalls and mistakes that inexperienced copywriters can make. If you want to know more about avoiding these and other copywriting mistakes, take a look at the featured resource below where you can download a copy of a free report, Copywriting Blunders, so you will be forewarned and can make your copy more effective. Download, read it and take action 😊

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